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Camel Gifts

A camel is an even-toed ungulate within the genus Camelus, bearing distinctive fatty deposits, known as humps, on its back. There are two species of camels: the dromedary or Arabian camel has a single hump, and the Bactrian camel has two humps. Dromedaries are native to the dry desert areas of West Asia, and and Bactrian camels are native to Central and East Asia.


Overview of the Camel

Overview of the Camel

There are two different types of camels, dromedary and Bactrian. The dromedary camel has a single hump, while the Bactrian camel has two humps. The camel is an expert at surviving in harsh conditions: it can survive for months without water in dry, barren places, while consuming only thorny and salty desert plants, and relying on the single or double hump (stores of fat) on their back for energy. The camel uses this “backpack” of fat during times where there is little or no food. When the fat is consumed, the hump will flop to the side of the camel. When a camel does drink water, it can drink up to 27 gallons in only a few minutes.

Camels live in deserts and dry grasslands in North Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia. Due to their hardiness, camels have been used by humans for centuries to transport supplies across the desert.

A camel’s foot has two hoofed toes, linked together by skin. When walking, the toes spread far apart, which prevents the camel from sinking into the sand. When camels walk, they move the front and back legs of a side together, which creating a rolling gait that has led to them being called “ships of the desert”. This rolling gait is very effective; in the sand, camels can travel over 19 miles a day.

Camels have large eyes and nostrils, which provides them with good eyesight and sense of smell. To protect their large eyes, camels have three sets of eyelids. This helps protect their eyes during a sandstorm. Two of the eyelids are fringed with long lashes, which help keep sand out, while the third eyelid keeps the camel’s eyes clean. Camel can also protect their nose by closing their nostrils to help keep sand out of the camel’s nose.

About the Author
Jacob Maddox manages content for Wildlife Animals http://www.wildlife-animals.com an educational wildlife and animal website. Jacob also guest writes for Dog Pound http://www.dog-pound.net

Camel Gifts


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